Tag Archive for #ASCD13

Freeman Hrabowski at #ASCD13

I knew while hearing Freeman Hrabowski speak at #ASCD13 that his speech would be the one I include in my next Monday Musings post for my staff.  He had such a powerful message that I had to share with them. Here is a cross-posting from my staff memo blog:
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This weekend I got to attend the national ASCD conference in Chicago. I was fortunate to have the chance to attend it with a Press Pass, which got me in for free, but I just had to tweet/blog a lot about that (definitely something I am good at!)  I already have several posts up with more to come. If you’re interested you can find them on my professional blog at principalj.net.

One of the great speakers I heard at this conference was Freeman Hrabowski, President of the University of Maryland Baltimore County.  Hrabowski’s story began as a young boy when he marched with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and he has continued his passion to change the story for children and minorities.  He has led his University to change the story for minorities in STEM subjects (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math).

 Hrabowski spoke about  matching high expectations along with the importance of building community among students, helping faculty retool teaching to start where students are and emphasizing collaboration among students, and building trust so that students are comfortable asking for help.  The one skill he wants every student going to college with is the ability to ask good questions.

Some other “nuggets” of wisdom I quickly typed during his presentation include:

  • We must empower children to speak for themselves.
  • Excellence is never an accident, it is a result of sincere effort.
  • Choice, not chance determines your destiny.
  • Many students that would be the first generation to pursue college need to see others do it first. We need to share our stories with them of our struggles and how we got to where we are. We need to share stories of others so they can believe it is possible.
  • It is not cheating when people work together (talked about cooperative learning).
  • We want our children to be passionate about learning.
  • Even when a child loses parents, if there is a teacher who cares, that child will rise to the occasion.
  • Some of our students go through hell. Give them structure and let them know you care about them.
Hrabowksi ended with the powerful quote from Mahatma Gahndi:
“Your beliefs become your thoughts, 
Your thoughts become your words, 
Your words become your actions, 
Your actions become your habits, 
Your habits become your values, 
Your values become your destiny.”
 
While our school population isn’t as diverse as the schools he spoke of, I couldn’t help but listen to him, thinking of many of our students’ needs and the backgrounds they come from.  Each of you play such an important role in the lives of our students; many of you providing the only structure, kindness, understanding and expectations that they have each day (several of you also providing clothes and snacks). Then you for all that you do for our students each and every day! 
 

#ASCD13 Storified Twitter Feed

Whether you were following the #ASCD13 twitterfeed from your couch at home, or there in person and following tweets from other sessions you also wanted to attend, there were many great tweets to learn from. Thankfully, Brad Currie “storified” the tweets each day so I decided to put them here in case I want to find them again.  Over the past few years, I have found myself looking back at older blog posts that I wrote and use them for my learning and reflection so I thought this would be a great place to put the storified tweets from #ASCD13.

Here’s the #ASCD13 recap for 3/16/13

[View the story “#ASCD13 Recap for 3.16.13″ on Storify] Here’s the #ASCD13 recap for 3/17/13 [View the story “#ASCD13 Recap ~ Sunday, March 17″ on Storify]

Connecting with great educators at #ASCD13

This is the first of several posts I’ll be writing to share about my awesome learning at the #ASCD13 conference in Chicago.  Of all the conferences I have ever attended, ASCD was definitely the best for 2 reasons:
1. I met almost all of my favorite “Tweeps” from my Twitter PLN in real life, which allowed me to have awesome conversations all day long.
2. There is such a huge variety of learning sessions to attend (over 400) that include top notch educators from around the country (i.e. Will Richardson, Regie Routman, Doug Fisher, Nancy Frey, Eric Sheninger, Jay McTighe, Jane Pollock, Heidi Hayes Jacobs, the list go on…).
In fact my only complaint at #ASCD13 is that there are too many awesome sessions to choose from that I had some really difficult decisions to make each hour of the day!!

I have previously written numerous posts on the power of Twitter, like:
ASCD: Building a Professional Learning Network to Save you from Admin Island
Is Social Media Taking Away from Personalization and Relationships?
Using Twitter for 24/7 Professional Development

I felt sorry for some of the educators I saw at #ASCD13 that attended alone and sat by themselves in sessions and break times. I also drove there alone, however, was surrounded by educators that I connect with everyday on Twitter. I feel so connected to them that it was like connecting with old friends at my high school reunion and then continuing to have great conversations all day long no matter which session I attended.  My day started out by having breakfast with Eric Sheninger in the Press room and the day continued to get better!

I was pleased to hear Twitter recommended as a powerful tool by almost every speaker of the day, as a source for great learning. My favorite tweets on this topic:

So now, I just have to share pictures of meeting my PLN in person. Can you guess the Tweep? (for those of you not on Twitter, Tweep is the term for a connected “friend” on Twitter).

#ASCD13 Post: Turn the Battleship on a Dime: Keys to Initiating Sustainable Change

One of the great sessions I attended at #ASCD13 was on sustainable change led by the great Eric Sheninger, or else known as @NMHS_Principal. Eric was a phenomenal speaker and I took copious notes in his session (that includes many audience responses) as follows:

Why Change? We need to, because the world has changed, it is fundamentally different, we are in a globally connected world. How can we say we are preparing our kids to be successful to do what they want to do if we don’t allow them to use the tools that eveyrone else uses to be successful?

Why doesn’t change work?
It is done to people, no buy-in, don’t support the rpocess, always changing from one thing to the next, we give up before the learning curve is experienced, overwelmed by number of things to change.

Why has it failed in your school?
It goes against tradition, people are not given a chance to fail or take risks

Why is change so hard? People are so comfortable bc they are not challenged to think differently. Status quo, if it isn’t broke why fixt it, this too shall pass.

Why is change so hard?
Fear, void of leadership, no vision, lack of knowledge

Why is change so hard?
Instability, too many initiatives at once, resistance, one size fits all initiatives.

It’s difficult to transition a school or district if it doesn’t make sense.

It’s important to identify the obstacles
1. This is too hard
Change is not easy. Requires work, risk-taking, learnign from mistakes, and committemtn, no fear of failure. “The price of change is measured by our will and courage, our persistence, in the face of difficulty.” -Peter Block

2. I don’t have time for this
-most common excuse
-in a profession focused on making a difference in the life of a child. “I don’t find the time to learn and get better. I make the time to learn and get better.”

3. Lack of Collaboration
We already know who on our staff don’t want to collaborate. How do we get them to intrinsically want to change, becuase they might be better for kids. We can’t go to a one-size fits all approach.

4. Directives and Mandates
“You can’t force committemnt, what you can do….You nudge a little here, insprie a little there, and provide a role model. Your primary influence is the environment you create” -Peter Senge

5. Hierarchy in Schools
Result-inflexible, lack of freedom/autonomy to take risks, ideas are squashed

6. No Support
Time, resources, money, pd, etc.

7. Fear of change
How do we as colleagues, administrators help each other overcome fear and get others to want to change?

8. The Resistance (Naysayers and antagonists)

9. Poor professional development

10. Frivolous purchases
It is the beahviors/practices that make the purchases relevant and applicable.

“When obstacles arise, you change your direction to reach your goal; you do not change your decision to get there.” Zig Zigler

Change begins with us. “You must be the change you want to see in the world.” ~Gandhi

If you are doing something because you got a grant, can it be sustained? If not, then why are you doing it?

Change often fails if there’s not shared vision, or communication of the vision.

“Let the teachers decide what they need to get better.” @NMHS_Principal

The Sustainable Changes that have been made at Eric’s School:
grading (7 criteria to fail kids)
academies
teaching and learning web2.0
independet open courseware study
byod
professional growth period
AP culture
social media

Getting excited for the ASCD 2013 Conference!!!

Image from ASCD Conference Page
 

ASCD is one of my go-to sources for ongoing personal PD through the monthly Educational Leadership  and the numerous books published each year.  For years I have wanted to attend the annual ASCD conference and this year I finally get to, because it is going to be in Chicago (just a 2 1/2 hour drive for me).  While this conference has 3 days packed of amazing sessions to be offered, those that cannot attend can follow the twitter hashtag #ASCD13 or even attend virtually.  I will only be able to go on Saturday, but will be following #ASCD13 on the other days.  

 
If you’re planning to attend, make sure to download the app MyASCD2013 for a handy schedule and planning tool. I found it super easy to browse the schedule by time or speaker and simply “star” sessions I was interested in to narrow down my choices (from 400) down to a handful in each time slot. Here’s what it looks like so far:
Sorry, but the screenshot doesn’t make it legible to read in the image.

The #ASCD13 conversation has already started on Twitter as we narrow down our choices:

 
 
 
 
To which my response is…
 
 
 
 
In addition to the great learning at #ASCD13 I am looking forward to meeting some of the folks in my Twitter PLN for the first time or reconnecting again.  These folks include (but are not limited to): @KathyPerret @NMHS_Principal @Joe_Mazza @DrSpikeCook @tomwhitby and my #WIAmigos: @twhitford @leah_whit @ErinKohl @Joesanfelippofc   You’ll be able to find me in my #WIAmigos t-shirt